france


Dad’s birthday coincided with the trip, and while he had to spend the actual day on the flight home, we decided to pre-celebrate his 55th in a place fitting for the occasion. Taillevent, holder of Michelin stars for 60 years seemed a natural choice.

The cork off our bottle and Taillevent's wine card

The cork off our bottle and Taillevent's wine card

The meal starts off with a warm welcome at the door by the maitre’d, who led us into the main dining room, one dressed in oak wood panels, neither too formal nor intimate. Perfect for business lunches, as many of our fellow diners seemed to be doing. Warm, cheesy gougeres appeared on our table while we considered the menu, a plate on each side of our four-top to prevent potential fights over the extra gougere. Our bread plates were freely filled by the conscientious bread steward, both white and wheat versions excellent, warm to the touch, crusty and with pillowy soft crumb. In general, service was excellent, from my email correspondence to the warm welcome by the maitre’d at the door, and the proper but not oppressive service by servers who seemed happy to serve, neither trying too hard to be your friend, nor coldy snobbish. Taillevent is known for its amazing cellar, and besides an impressive wine menu, they also provided a small card listing the different varietals and their most desirable age, a cheat sheet of sorts for the lesser vinophiles.  Since it was a celebratory meal, we splurged on a 2000 vintage Volnay, smooth and restrained, no outsized flavors and pleasant with meat.
Game aspic and mushroom cream

Game aspic and mushroom cream

The amuse bouche was a cold aspic made with game, topped by mushroom creme. Ma hated it, I thought it was alright, nothing distinguishing.
lobster + eggs

lobster + eggs

We had 3 choices of both appetizers and entrees from the 80Euro lunch set. Pa and I picked badly for entrees, the white bean soup with ravioli was too sour, too cheesy and thick, and ravioli undercooked. But Mum and Pak’s appetizers were heavenly, Mum’s scrambled eggs infused with the concentrated sweetness of lobster in every bite.
Foie Gras

Foie Gras

Pak’s foie gras was as traditional as it came, a thick puck with a jam based top, served with what else? brioche toast. I totally had plate envy, it was very yummy.
Scallops with spinach puree

Scallops with spinach puree

Veal chops

Veal chops

Ma’s scallops and our veal were well cooked but not impressive at all.
Hazelnut chocolate cake with amaretto ice cream

Hazelnut chocolate cake with amaretto ice cream

Pineapple napoleon

Pineapple napoleon

A cheese course preceded dessert, where three of us picked the sinfully rich, chocolately dacquoise packed with nutty flavor, while dad went for a pineapple based dessert, pineapple being one of his favorite fruit. Before dessert, the servers brought out an oversized glass sculpture with candles for my dad to blow out. Oddly, it was not a cake or even anything edible. Oh well.
petit fours

petit fours

Petit fours were passed around at the end of our 2+ hour lunch, a plate for each of us to prevent disagreements. Classy. Of the 5 bites, the peanut brittle and sesame seed tuile resembled chinese desserts and the fruit pastille tasted like haw flakes. Big hits with my parents of course.

In summary, a good meal with exemplary service, but I can’t help but feel disappointed by the pedestrian cooking, reminiscent more of a high-end hotel buffet than a 2 star restaurant. I was not expecting anyone to reinvent the wheel, still, I had hoped for something special.

Taillevent

15 Rue Lammenais, Paris

www.taillevent.com

For a self-avowed foodie, a trip to Paris did not seem complete without a pilgrimage to a Michelin starred restaurant, preferably 3 starred. I picked L’Astrance after consulting with the boyfriend, and once we roped in a French speaking friend to secure the reservations a month in advance, we were set for my first encounter with haute cuisine in Paris.

Astrance is tucked away in an unassuming corner of th 16th arrondisement, a cozy room fitting 26 diners of which we were two at lunchtime. L’Astrance is also known for innovation and value in the realms of haute gastronomy. 3 surprise menus are available at lunchtime, the 70 euro 3-course option, the $120 6 course meal, and the $190 option that ensures you will leave with groaning from indigestion. Expensive but not astronomical. We prudently went for the middle ground (but not frugal enough to consider the smallest option), and still left eating an extraordinary amount of excellent food, from amuse bouche to mignardises.  

Foie Gras and Mushrooms

Foie Gras and Mushrooms

The first appetizer after little amuse bouches of fruit and nut nibbles and an indian themed carrot and yogurt shooter was the iconic mille feuille of foie gras and mushroom, where wafer thin layers of raw sliced mushrooms ensconce slabs of room temperature foie, over a sweet pastry base. The mushroom/foie wedge was layered and cut with surgical precision, and the taste, light, yet earthy and fungal at the same time. P’s sweet riesling paired well, and was one of our favorite of the 7 pours he got that afternoon.

scallops

scallops

A pair of scallops sat prettily with a cooked salad of radishes, turnips and edible flowers, evoking not winter but spring. A duo of purees, one peanut and the other citrus reminded me of gado gado for some reason.

shellfish in yuzu broth

shellfish in yuzu broth

The south-east asian theme seemed to extend into the fish course, a perfectly cooked piece of whitefish sitting on a peanuty base. I was most impressed however with the bowl of shellfish broth that came with the fish. Till now I remember the sensation of unnaturally sweet raw clam slithering down my throat, the concentrated flavors of the cold bonito-based broth enlivened by a fragrant yuzu oil.  

lentils, pepper and jabugo

lentils, pepper and jabugo

Chef Barbot is unafraid of incorporating global flavors, and the next dish, AOCed lentils with chorizo accents and an a slice of cured ham is thoroughly Spanish. I wish I had rice or toast to sop up the lentils, sauce and all. The meat course is usually always the most boring, but we loved our intensely flavored grilled veal, served simply with some meat sauce and fried leeks. The shiraz paired there was another high point.

one of 6 desserts

one of 6 desserts

Dessert is usually my favorite part of the meal, and L’Astrance’s line up with very strong, with 6 desserts from a grapefruit custard to a sugar cylinder layered with a sesame tuile. My favorite was a meringue roll-up filled with citrus cream. Least favorite? A fruit bowl, novelty for caucasian diners, but rote at Chinese restaurants. To add insult to injury, the lychees weren’t even that sweet!

L’Astrance is the smallest of the 3-star restaurants in the city, possible the most casual too, with a decor that is bright, modern but pedestrian and good but often slow service, given only 3 front-of-house members rather than the army of waitstaff we encountered at Taillevent later that week. The fact that we were seated in a small loft area above the main dining room, aka restaurant Siberia and had to fight to get the waitstaff’s attention did not help. However, the food is top notch and P and I relished each moment of it, of Paris, good food, the two of us and our plans to chase our Michelin etoiles!

L’Astrance

4 rue Beethoven

http://lastrance.abemadi.com/fr/r/Paris/132/

At the mention of Paris, most people think about the sparkling Eiffel Tower, stylish Champs Elysee and lovers kissing on street corners. My Paris is not about those iconic places and images. Instead, Paris to me is built on flour, sugar and vats of chocolate,
A pair of croissants

A pair of croissants

on the buttery scent of fresh croissants, the white-gloved service at high-end chocolate shops,

Salivating over Laduree's window display

Salivating over Laduree's window display

the splendid sugary window displays at patisseries.

It is about the cakes, brightly hued, sophisticatedly designed and wonderfully tasting. P and I chanced upon Sadaharu Aoki’s stall at the sprawling food hall within Galaries Lafayette and just watched slack-jawed at the gorgeous cakes and  brilliantly lacquered chocolates, succumbing to a light lemony cake with a hazelnute cream in a zen-like dome design, a perfect pick-me-up after an unsuccessful attempting at shopping. The sweets in Paris are less sweet than those sickeningly saccharine cupcakes with sky-high frosting found in New York, and makes eating them less guilty.

Confection from Sadaharu Aoki

Confection from Sadaharu Aoki

 It is also about the tasting and comparing, for the sweet treats are so easy to come by.

Pierre Herme macarons

Pierre Herme macarons

Wiwi supplied us with a big box of Pierre Herme macarons while I made multiple trips to Laduree for the quintessential macaron face-off. I was not too impressed by the PH’s famous Ispahan flavor (too similar to Bandung), but found the flavor combinations of other macarons innovative, pleasing and not too sweet. The pamplemousse (grapefruit) and wasabi flavor was my favorite, lightly citrusy with a mildly bracing finish. In contrast, Laduree’s flavors were more traditional and sweeter but the texture of the macaron, stiffer and crispier than PH’s was better.  My find of the trip came from Laduree, a humble looking pastry called the Kouign Amann, a Breton cake resembling a badly smooshed up croissant, with alternating layers of brioche and the most flavorful butter. The most sinful pleasure was to break it up with my bare hands, put the hand-torn bits into my mouth, and feel the sensation of melting butter against my tongue. Simply lovely. And Paris just got so much nicer, despite the grey skies, the occasionally blase Parisians, and unsatisfactory shopping, all because of Kouign Amann.

We joke around our house that our father is a dyed in the wool China Man, especially when mealtimes are concerned. Like me, dad is an adventurous eater (you can’t call someone who’s had dog meat otherwise), but nowadays, he is happiest when there’s rice on the table.  Consequently, we incorporated an Asian meal everyday while we were in Paris. Paris is not exactly known for the diversity of ethnic food options, but with some tips and a little sleuthing, we were pleasantly surprised by the quality of the Asian food Paris had to offer.
The 13th arrondisement was our stomping grounds for Asian cuisine, being where Pari’s original Chinatown (another has sprung up in Belleville) is located. Over the course of 3 nights, we became intimately familiar with the triangular patch of urban area marked by Tolbiac, Porte d’Ivry and Porte d’Choisy metro stops, each almost equidistant from the row of restaurants that line both Avenues d’Ivry and Choisy.
pho special at pho 14

pho special at pho 14

Vietnam was part of the French Indochine, so we were not surprised to see a good representation of Vietnamese cuisine in Paris. I found Pho 14 by way of chowhound, and the pho was just what the doctor ordered on a night where temperatures had plummeted 10 degrees celsius from the night ago. The lines were spilling out of the restaurant as we arrived and people actually opted for quicker but chillier al fresco dining in sub 40s weather. A neighboring Vietnamese pho shop happily absorbed the spillover from Pho 14, but for those who wait, they will be treated to steaming bowls of pho. Both the beef and chicken broth, while a little less scalding hot than I prefer had meaty, concentrated flavors and were topped with fresh meat and the bounciest meatballs I’ve seen in a while. We also ate freshly fried spring rolls wrapped in lettuce and dipped in sweet and smelly dipping sauce and some rice crepes served with Vietnamese pate and irresistibly fragrant fried onion bits.

roasted platter
roasted platter

While P was studying abroad in Paris, he used to eat roast duck at a Chinatown restaurant and would constantly reminisce about it after he returned to the US. This bit of memory drove my appetite for roast duck in Paris. Unfortunately, P’s memory has blurred somewhat, so instead of a defined address, we chose our roasted meat restaurant based on the shininess of the lacquered ducks on displayed, ending up in Restaurant Imperial Choisy. While the roasted meats are Cantonese, the restaurateurs are Teochew (yes, Teochew seems to be the dialect to know in Paris). The roast duck turned out well, with a crisp skin and flavorful meat, but the roast pork was too chewy. Cooked dishes fared better, and we enjoyed a simply steamed bass and a very good rendition of claypot tofu devoid of the brown gunk that mar too many chinatown dishes. 

steamed bass
steamed bass

A couple days later, we wanted to return to Restaurant Imperial Choisy, but due to a wait decided to venture over to the restaurant across the street to Likafo. What a stroke of luck, because the latter was even better. The room, decorated with strips of chinese menu signs (its authentic!) was packed with mostly Chinese diners tucking into a myraid of dishes. We started with a seafood and seaweed soup and was pleasantly surprised to find the fishballs bouncy and not the gummy specimens found in the US. A bowl of steamed tofu was packed with homemade tofu and the vegetables stir fried with fermented beancurd had excellent “wok hei”. The steamed pork patty topped with a huge chunk of salted fish reminded me of a favorite restaurant in Geylang, and we were treated to a delicately steamed flounder, exhorbitant for chinatown standards at 40 euros, but done really really well. Possibly the best steamed fish I’ve ever had outside of Asia. In general, we found the cooking style in Parisian Chinese joints to be lighter than those in US chinatowns and much less dependent on oil and sugar. Once again, the servers spoke a mix of Chinese, Cantonese and Teochew, and my dad felt right at home being called “ah hia” meaning big brother by the middle-aged waiter.  

Japanese - Chinese at Ebis

Japanese - Chinese at Ebis

Ebis was our only non-Chinatown chinese pick, and came highly recommended by WiWi, our friend from Chicago days. She joined us for dinner at this restaurant in the 1st arrondisement, a cross-culture marriage between a Chinese kitchen and a Japanese front-of-house, or a Taiwanese proprietor and his Japanese wife. While lunchtime crowds get to eat ramen, the dinner menu is purely Chinese, with a focus on Sichuan cuisine. Only the green tea ice-cream with azuki beans was Japanese. WiWi had so eloquently described her favorite dish, S15 on the lunch menu, prior to dinner that we had to order it. S15 turned out to be chicken, roasted and then fried with crispy skin and impossibly moist meat. The scallops in black bean and chili sauce were big and fresh tasting in the slightly spicy sauce while the mixed tofu and seafod patty were fried greaselessly to form golden nuggets that spurt savory juices in one’s mouth. Rice at Ebis was excellent, fragrant and not too sticky, and takes the ribbon for “best rice”. That rice was not free. Neither was tea. But that seemed to be modus operandi in Paris. Finally, in Paris, you do not get fortune cookies after mealtime either, but that is no real loss when dinner is good!

Names and Addresses:

Pho Banh Cuon 14 (129 Ave de Choisy)

Restaurant Imperial Choisy (32 Ave de Choisy)

Likafo (39 Ave de Choisy)

Restaurant Ebis (19 rue Saint-Roch)

Our apartment
Our apartment
For our week in Paris, I opted to rent an apartment in the Marais with the plan to cook in, which of course turned out to be a flight of fancy. Indeed, with so much choices within walking distance, why bother?
The Marais, with its maze of narrow paths that criss-cross at will and barrage of trendy fashion shops remind me of New York’s Soho. Like Soho, the Marais is also home to a mind boggling number of cafes and restaurants, but also markets, epiceries and a dense bakery per square feet count. We briefly sampled the wares from a few restaurants:
Boulangerie Malineau – Situated one block away from my parents’ apartment, this was where we picked up breakfast most days. The baguette was not as good as the bakery right around the corner from my parents’ place, but the baked goods are really good, with a croissant that shatters into salty, buttery bits and a chausson aux poire with a rich and creamy custard complementing the slices of sweet pear.
 
falafel sandwich
falafel sandwich

L’As du Fallafel– In the world of falafel joints, L’As du Fallafel has attained rockstar status, not least because it has the seal of approval from Lenny Kravitz, whose picture is prominently displayed on the wall of the restaurant’s dining room. The falafels have been quoted in press, written in blogs, featured in travel guides and truely thoroughly hyped up. It deserves praise no doubt, the pita warm and fresh, the falafel crisp, the vegetables plentiful and the tahini sauce tangy. The fried eggplant, soft with a little smokiness is my favorite part of the sandwich. The bursting sandwich makes for a fulfilling but messy lunch. Great tasting, but in my opinion, best sandwich in the world may be a little pushing it. Sitting in costs 1.50 more than take out though, so next time I would take it to go and eat at Place des Vosges, saving my money for an after-lunch dessert.

Dinner at Min Chau
Dinner at Min Chau

Min Chau– Manhattan restaurants can be tiny, but Min Chau is even smaller. Imagine a 8 by 20 room packed to the rafters with 20 odd customers and 4 servers, with a small steam table keeping a dozen or so dishes warm and wall space economically utilized, lined with bottles of beer and wine. This literal hole-in-the wall was a block away from my parents’ apartment, and we headed there after picking my parents up from the Eurostar terminal at 9pm. We slid into a really snug table for 4 with barely enough room to even stretch our arms to take off our coats,our knees banging with each others’ under the table. But there is something that makes eating in this crowded room appealing, and it is the unassuming but comforting Vietnamese homestyle cooking, combined with the friendliness of the proprietress and her crew, talking to customers like they are (and probably are) old friends, cajoling them to finish their food. We shared 3 of 4 appetizers and took the proprietress’s recommendations for mains, ending up with a shrimp curry, a chicken ginger stirfry, a tender beef stew and a honeyed pepper pork dish, all saucy and terrific with rice. Best of all was dessert, a banana and coconut soup topped with toasted ground peanuts for a savory twist. As we spoke in Mandarin during dinner, the proprietress took interest in our table and started talking, first in Mandarin, then Cantonese and even more surprisingly Teochew! At the end of the meal, we left Min Chau feeling like we’ve known her and her place for ages.   

Couscous royale
Couscous royale

Couscous stall at le Marche des Enfants Rouge– Couscous was on my list of my things to eat, and wandering into the Marche des Enfants Rouge- a daily covered market with deep historical roots- while trolling the streets of Marais, we saw a stall already brisk in business at 11+ and decided it was time for lunch. We sat on an outdoor table shivering as the platter of couscous royale was served to us, billowing hot steam. It was served in a dish small but deep, and on the couscous were different pieces of meat and vegetables layered precariously at the edge of the dish. One careless move and you find yourself flinging couscous, or even worse, a hunk of lamb, a piece of chicken, mechoui sausage or one of the two lamb meatballs on the table. The couscous was nice and dry, soaking up the tomato-ey and peppery stew while the cuts of meat were fork tender and flavorful. My favorite must be the sausage, spicy and aromatic with cumin. Too bad there was only one and I had to share with P!  

Names and Addresses:
Boulangerie Malineau (18 rue Vielle du Temple)
L’As du Falafel (34 rue de Rosiers)
Min Chau (10 rue de la Verrerie)
le Marche des Enfants Rouge (39 rue de Bretagne)
a train of marrons

a train of marrons

I am no vinophile, not even a particularly enthusiastic drinker. So wine was not first in my mind when I floated the idea to P to hang out in Beaune for the weekend. Instead, the thing that captured my imagination was the food, especially the food fair with all sorts of gustatory delights advertised in various blogs. The food must be good, I rationalized. After all, Burgundy is the purported stomach of France.

Escargot!

Escargot!

 

 

 

The food fair was as good as I imagined. The advertisements did not lie. Imagine a New York street fair, without the mundane stalls selling socks and knockoff bags, strip out the ubiquitous kebab stand and the badly made crepe trucks, take away cotton candy and kettle corn. Replace the dirty water dog carts with cauldrons of steaming andouillette and merguez, add stalls dedicated to the sale of mushrooms fresh and dry, organic honey, and macarons; standkeepers giving out samples of foie gras on toast; crowds huddling around picnic tables extracting fat nubs of escargot meat from their shell while sipping glasses of local wine.  It being late fall/early winter, glasses of hot spiced wine and bags of warm toasted chestnuts were also readily available. That would be Beaune’s food fair. For 2 days we eschewed sit-down lunches in favor of incessant munching on the go. Sunday’s lunch read like this: a plate of buttery fried frogs’ legs, a thick slab of jambon persille – chunks of smoked ham encased in a radioactive green parsley aspic, a loaf of fresh baked baguette and for dessert, half a dozen of freshly shucked oysters. The family sitting next to our park bench were spooning creamy cheese onto bread and feeding their kids Camembert and Brie. That’s my idea of a picnic!

deconstructed oeufs meurette

deconstructed oeufs meurette

For dinner, we relied on the suggestions of our lovely innkeeper, Mdm Grillon of Hotel Grillon, who even helpfully made our reservations given our limited (nonexistent for me) French. We had dinner at L’Ecusson on our first night at Beaune, where we landed an hour ahead of our reservation due to a rapidly losing battle to jet lag. Being the first to arrive, we got to relax in the elegant ochre colored room and enjoyed the full attention of the charmingly hospitable front of house. The meal, innovative and delicious helped lift our flagging spirits some more. I was expecting my oeufs meurette to resemble other oeuf meurettes I’ve eaten, poached eggs in red wine broth. Instead, I got a trio of bites, a most satisfyingly earthy puree of mushrooms topped with a wobbly raw yolk and a sprig of chive, thick slices of bacon on a sesame toast, and a shot of vin chaud. Our mains were a contrast of heavy and light. P selected coq au vin for his main dish and was rewarded with a rich, almost inky stew of wine cooked chicken with its usual accoutrements of pearl onions and mushrooms whereas my perch was simply pan-seared and served on a bed of diced tomato, zuchinni and a tinge of citrus that summoned memories of a warm summer’s day instead of a chilly fall night. We ended the night with a round of cheese and the best baba rum P’s had.  A great deal for less than 30 Euros each, not including wine. We walked back to the hotel drowsy and full, thanking our lucky stars that our hotel is a good 1 km away from the town center, allowing us to digest while we strolled home.

tarte tatin

tarte tatin

On the second night, Madam Grillon had booked a table at La Ciboulette, a very popular bistro location on quiet side street of Beaune. La Ciboulette excels at traditional Burgundian cuisine in a relaxed setting, and compared to the calm elegance of L’Ecusson, the dining rooms at La Ciboulette were a picture of activity, with servers weaving around packed tables of diners delivering platters upon towering platters of food. When in Rome, do as the Romans do, and when in Beaune, it means toasting to an aperitif of kir, a pretty pink cocktail of local aligote wine and cassis. The appetizers came after our welcome plate of olives were polished off, for me two thick slabs of foie gras mi cuit served with warm toast, and for the boyfriend liquid cashmere, incarnated in his dish of quenelles, morels and sweetbreads enrobed in a most luxuriously creamy butter and cream sauce that was heart attack inducing but worth every sip. I won the main course challenge, for although P enjoyed his simple dish of huge seared scallops, my steak charolaise was spectacular, cooked a point and full of savory meat juices. The sliced fresh Burgundy truffles were just icing on the cake, imparting a light earthy aroma to the sauce. A platter of stinky cheeses including the lovely Citeaux and a big slab of Epoisses (smells like wet socks, but tasting much milder) and a bowl of fromage blanc later, we attacked our desserts as though we were starving, my Tarte Tatin beautifully golden brown, with a firm crust and the cooked apple disintegrating in my mouth effortlessly while P had his first creme brulee for the trip, with a rich pistachio taste but unfortunately a little charred. For $38 per person, a lot of deliciousness. No wonder La Ciboulette was awarded the Michelin Bib Gourmand designation in the most recent guide.

Of course, we did touristy things while not stuffing ourselves silly, visiting the well restored hospice and following the many roving brass bands in colorful costumes as they marched through the streets of Beaune playing upliftingly loud tunes. But even without the festivities, I still expect Beaune to be worth a visit regardless of seasons, particularly for the eaters and drinkers of the world.

Names and websites:

Hotel Grillon

http://www.hotel-grillon.fr/

L’Ecusson

http://www.ecusson.fr/

La Ciboulette

http://www.viamichelin.co.uk/viamichelin/gbr/dyn/controller/poiPerformPage?productId=41102&id=901


img_3610Its only my second day in Beaune, and I already understand that everything here is about wine. The town is surrounded by wineries, the layout of this medieval town is such that every third or fourth shop is a wine shop and wine caves and cellars lined with walls and walls of wine bottles make up an alternative underground city. On this weekend, vinophiles go extra-wild as it is La Vente des Vins, an annual festival celebrating, what else but the famous Burgundian wines. The festival revolves around Les Trois Glorieuses, three events happening in Beaune this weekend: the grand tasting meal at the prestigious Chateau du Clos du Vougeot, the multi-million dollar wine auction benefitting the Hospice de Beaune and La Paulee, the most drunken BYOB lunch imaginable. While P and I did not participate in these events, we still had a glorious time literally soaking in the bacchanalian good cheer, voluntarily stuffing ourselves like force fed geese with wine and food. 

img_3658

Wine is the first order of business. We are in wine soaked Burgundy after all. We took an informative wine appreciation lesson at Sensation Vins, where the instructor patiently went through the essentials of Burgundian wines and guided us wine novices through a blind tasting of 6 wines. The lessons about terroir were a truly a little more than over our heads, but we walked out more confident about wine tasting abilities and tested them out at the wine caves later on. Upon our instructor’s recommendation, we then found ourselves at Maison Bouchard Aine & Fils, a venerable wine merchant since 1746 for a cheese and wine degustation. For an hour, we took its “tour of the five senses”, where it converted some of its musty underground cellars into interactive classrooms to showcase the sound, sight, taste, touch and scent of wine. We also tasted 11 wines in a tasting glass we got to keep as a souvenir, including multiple grand crus and a Corton Grand Cru almost as old as my dad. The cheeses were all local and we fell in love with the Citeaux cheese, a raw, runny and funky smelling cheese made by monks of the Abbaye de Citeaux. Now to find it and smuggle it back home.

Next up, the food of Beaune….

Sensation Vin

http://www.sensation-vin.com/en/

Bouchard Aine & Fils

http://www.en.bouchard-aine.fr/index.php?p=365